Astrophysics spring trimester  2007

course evaluation

 syllabus   &  course expectations

 Astronomy Picture of the Day        the latest astrophysics discoveries
  what's up in the 
sky this week       Skywatcher's Diary for this month

 
  Monday,
May 28
Tuesday,
  May 29

Wednesday,
May 30

Thursday,
May 31

Friday,
June 1
class



the last class
observing tomorrow morning

asteroid page
reading
(always done before class)


20(1,2,3,6,7)


things you should know the answer to before coming to class


where are the places star formation is occurring?

why there?

how can interstellar clouds become star formers?  what properties of the cloud must change (and how) so that the outward gas pressure becomes less that the inward gravitational force?




homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)





web stuff


 shockwaves

star formation:

star formation propagation
(grav collapse induced by shock wave from O/B stellar winds)

M16 before hubble
 Star-Birth in M16
the Eagle in 2005

shock-wave triggered starbirth
Hubble presents a family portrait of a parent and 6 offspring

star death/supernova:

Cygnus loop shock wave

spiral shock waves in galaxies:

M51 as seen by Hubble 2005

M83's emission nebulae and its spiral arms

  cloud-cloud collisions:

a bow shock near LL Orionis

the Antennae, a galaxy-galaxy collision


molecular clouds & cooling

molecules in space

interstellar and circumstellar molecules

the GMC at the heart Of Orion

Milky Way Molecule Map

Dark Bok Globules in IC 2944

B335
JPL press release on first GMC caught in the act of collapse
( the NY Times article Oct. 10, 1995)

Stellar Disks Set Stage for
Planet Birth in New Hubble Images



 first image of an extrasolar planet


weather on an extrasolar planet

statistics of exoplanets

summary of extrasolar planets properties

brown dwarfs, planets, and superplanets

lab





news/discoveries
of the week


28 new extrasolar planets discovered




onday,
May 21
Tuesday,
  May 22

Wednesday,
May 23

Thursday,
May 24

Friday,
May 25
class





reading
(always done before class)
18(2)
18(2)

conduction, convection, and radiation

Walker section 16(6)

in the astro textbook:
section 18(3,5)

pages 187-188,
202, 250

 pages 194-195


things you should know the answer to before coming to class
how did the temperature get to be so high at the center of the sun so that fusion could start?

 why doesn't the sun collapse under its own gravity?

why does the gas pessure increase with depth in the sun?

why does the gas temperature increase with depth in the sun?

how does the energy released in fusion get to the surface?
by what processes?


same questions
<-------

still await answers

+

how do we KNOW
(i.e., can verify observationally) that more massive stars live less long than less massive stars,
as our theory predicts?



know 3 or 4 examples of EACH energy transfer method (conduction, convection, and radiation), either found on earth or in your everyday life

be able to describe how the energy is transfered in each case!



homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)




bring to class the calculation of the (main sequence) lifetime of the sun that we started in class yesterday
(in years!)


for your planet:

1) attach a printed copy of your planet's star's radial velocity curve

2) find the lower limit to your planet's mass

3) % difference between your value and the accepted value
(it should be less than 2% unless your orbit is noticeably elliptical)

d) the planet's orbit size

e) % diff

f) a range for the planet's surface temperature (using a reasonable range for albedo)

g) the likely composition of your planet based on its formation temperature
(with justification!)





web stuff



ncssm asteroid project

lab





news/discoveries
of the week






  Monday,
May 14
Tuesday,
  May 15

Wednesday,
May 16

Thursday,
May 17

Friday,
May 18
class




jit due by noon
reading
(always done before class)

other ways to detect dark matter:

26(8)

page 567: know about MACHOs and WIMPs


8(6) on finding planets around other stars

24(3) on findng black holes in binary systems

18(1)

be ready to ask questions about fusion, even though we have some stuff to do on extra solar planets
18(2)

things you should know the answer to before coming to class

spend 30 minutes finding out about the dark side of the universe:

mass/energy inventory of the universe

especially recommended:
The Search for Dark Matter
Universe Reveals its Dark Side






bring a printed copy of your planet's radial velocity curve to class today

see planet catalogs under thursday

is your planet's star has more than 1 planet, bring only the radial velocity curve for that planet, not the combined radial velocity for that planet

you will also need to bring the period and spectral and luminosity class of your planet's star (e.g., G2V for the sun)

homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)



finish the calculation of the radius of the small and large stars (in your lab book) and bring them to class


bring to class:

from the physics equations that describe binary stars
(N's version of K's 3rd law, with special units; the center of mass condition,
the formula for speed in a circular orbit),
show that

mB3/(mA+mB)2 = PvA3/(2p)3

hint: start with N's version of K3 and then eliminate aB
  using the seesaw condition; then eliminate aA in favor of vA



web stuff
the spectroscopic binary applet

the eclipsing binary applet

mass/energy inventory of the universe

are periodic extinctions 
  statistically real?  a Scientific American debate


Alaska and aurora miniterm

Princeton catalog of extrasolar planets

France catalog of extrasolar planets

lab




binary star lab due....
news/discoveries
of the week

Hubble finds Ring of Dark Matter




 
Monday,
May 7
Tuesday,
May 8
Wednesday,
May 9
Thursday,
May 10
Friday,
May 11
class
 
 make sure that you have your SALMON book all this week in class

bring your lab book (the one you got back yesterday) to class, because we will start lab today
 bring calculator,
lab book,
salmon book,
large version of p. 18

we're doing lab
jit due by noon today 
see homework and lab below
reading
(always done before class)
 
19(9,10) 
 19(11)
 
 25(4) and box 25-2 on how to calculate the mass of our galaxy and what the results mean


things you should know the answer to before coming to class


in what ways could the binary system we talked about in class today be detected as a binary from earth?

look at the radial velocity curve on page 18 for RW Mon.... which star is being eclipsed at time = 0, A or B?
be able to explain





how to use Kepler's 3rd law to figure out the galaxy mass

how do we explain the resulting interior-mass-as-a-function-of-
distance-from-the galactic-center graph
homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)

age of the universe from hubble's constant due




find the mass of the galaxy inside the radius you were assigned in class; bring this on a piece of paper you will hand it (during class);
do the calculation on your own following the example in the section and box above... but you are welcome to check your answer with the other person doing your calculation


web stuff
 
 
 
 
 
lab
 
 
 
 in the binary lab we started yesterday, you should have solved for the individual masses of the two stars (in solar units)
last chance to bring your calculations (done in your lab book) of the masses of the two individual stars in the RW Mon binary system to classes and get credit 
news & discoveries
Mercury has a molten core 
biggest stellar explosion
ever

Chandra sees brightest supernova ever

biggest stellar explosion
ever

 
first-ever map of the surface of an exoplanet

Astronomers Find Super-massive Planet

  Monday,
April 30
Tuesday,
  May 1

Wednesday,
May 2

Thursday,
May 3

Friday,
May 4
class


jit due by 9 am


reading
(always done before class)

19(6-7):

what is the message of the H-R diagram?


19(8)


5(9) on the Doppler effect
&
26(5) on the expanding universe
(do NOT read the box associated with this section as it is absolutely bogus)
4(4, 5 [6], 7)

things you should know the answer to before coming to class
why do more stars lie in the "main-sequence" region than in any other?
why spectral lines are broad and cover a range in wavelength


see JIT

all of Kepler's laws
and be a master of Kepler's 3rd law


homework
(written assignments
to be turned in)




bring to class:
a calculation of the temperature of the corona of the sun in order to explain the existence of a FeXIV bright line

(on a piece of paper to hand in)

web stuff

doppler effect applet

a bow shock in the Orion nebula
what we saw at the observatory last night:

1) M44, the Beehive cluster

2) the constellation of Orion, the belt of Orion and M41, the Orion Nebula,
in the sword

3) Saturn with rings and its moon Titan with liquid lakes


lab





news/discoveries
of the week





 astro pages for April 2007

 astro pages for March 2007